Category: Naginata

Don’t be afraid of Tsuki

Kendo is a budo with a great amount of depth.  At the moment, there are four fundamental datotsu-bui – strike zones: men, kote, do and tsuki. Tsuki is sometimes regarded as an “advanced” technique, something you need skill to pull off effectively and safely.  This is sometimes extrapolated into “you Read More

The Naginata

Just like the katana, the naginata conjures up many images of feudal Japan: the dedicated footsoldier, the heroic onna-bushi and also the devout warrior-monk to name, but a few. Whilst grounded in truth, these perceptions have warped our image of the naginata and its use perhaps more so than any other traditional Japanese weapon. To many the naginata and its accompanying ryu-ha are “feminine” or the sole domain of the warrior-monks. This is far from the case!

Kendo Kyoshi 7-dan Hayashi demonstrating Kendo

Thus spoke Hayashi – Vol. 2

Evaluating budo equipment can be very difficult, especially as a newcomer to martial arts. We thought who better to ask than our resident kyoshi 7-dan Hayashi Sensei: he not only has a great understanding of his chosen art (kendo), but he also actively works in product development. Let’s take a Read More

Mastering the Manners and Aiming for Beautiful Kendo

There are all kinds of sports in our world, but a big difference between kendo and other sports is its approach towards “manners”. Many people have the image that if you take up kendo you will learn good manners. Why is kendo so strict when ti comes to enfocring etiquette? Read More

Important Factors in Winning – Concentration and Intuition

In order to win and achieve good results in sports, there are important areas other than physical abilities like strength and skill. Specifically, “concentration” and “intuition” play a key part. But unlike physical abilities, these are not measurable. How can we train ourselves in these areas? It is very important Read More

mokuso meditation in dojo

Why Mokuso?

I’m sure many of you would sit silently and meditate with your eyes closed both before and after practice. Some groups call it mokuso (silent thinking), some meiso (closed-eye thinking), or seiza (simply, sitting). When you join the dojo, the instructor will tell you the meaning and how to do Read More

Kendo Kamae holding Shinai

Budo and the core muscle

The core muscle is very important not only in Budo but in many sports, and training your core muscle has many benefits. In this edition I will introduce some ways of training your core muscle, including ways that are effective for Budo. The core muscle (Japanese taikan) broadly refers to Read More

Kendo player with Chudan no Kamae

Mental Training in Kendo

Kendo of course requires physical strength but also mental strength. There are many ways to train up your mentality, but the most basic level is mannerisms. This relates to other martial arts too, but it all “begins and ends with manners”. If you are aiming to be a strong kenshi, Read More

A girl wearing Kendo Men

“Kyu” and “Dan” in Budo

In Japanese Budo such as kendo, judo, kyudo, there are levels named “kyu” and “dan”. Each has its own characteristic, but many people wonder what the difference is between the two. Kyu is a word that describes the quality or the condition of objects as in “ikkyuhin”, “nikyuhin” and “sankyuhin” Read More